Is the African Retarded to a Certain Degree?

3 min


Is the African Retarded to a Certain Degree?

In 1903, 6 years before even Kwame Nkrumah was born, the first aeroplane was made by the famous Wright brothers.

In 1973, Martin Cooper, a Motorola researcher and executive, made the first mobile telephone call after the first mobile phone was made by Motorola.

A computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web in the 1990s which changed the way we access data on the internet.

I am telling you all these wonderful things for a reason. And the reason is that it seems while the white man is always busy thinking, researching and asking the big questions to invent some of the remarkable things around us, we Africans in Africa are worried about who dances best at a wedding or a church.

Don’t get me wrong. There have been a few black inventors, but almost all of them have been African-Americans or based outside Africa.

I don’t know if it’s the food we eat or the water we drink, we can’t seem to invent something so great back on our land that would change the entire world’s perspective about something.

We will say we don’t have the facilities or monies or whatever, how long is it going to take us to create the needed conditions to help us become great too?

I know someone will say the white men always steal the ideas of Africans and go to their land to invent things. That’s bullocks.

Within the African social media landscape, I see more videos of brides lined up to dance like hungry penguins each day, than of inventions or great thinkers exploring their abilities.

Our priorities have been misplaced for a long time. Look at the rise of China and India.

We are a population of over 1.2 billion and yet we can’t seem to make it happen for us. All we mostly do is talk and talk.

The white man invents Facebook and we become hooked on it. The white man invents Instagram, Snap Chat, Twitter and we make these platforms our home. There is nothing wrong with using these things—the question is, when can we also learn to do something great as these? What do we do with our brains and time really?

Perhaps, it’s a black man problem.

When I visited China a few years ago, I was wowed by their outstanding might in the field of inventions—I mean science and technology. They have banned Google, Whatsapp, Facebook, Twitter and most of the things we know as the big things of the internet today.

They have not just banned them, they have created their own too, for their people. Wonderful alternatives serving same and other purposes.

Look at Uber which has become ubiquitous. In China, Uber couldn’t survive because they have their own that works better for them.

Help me with your thoughts on this: what have we been doing and still doing with our brains and time as Africans on such a large continent?

It’s depressing and pathetic when you really sit down to think about our men and women.

Currently, in Ghana, we are looming—an absurd Ponzi scheme that you don’t need a diploma in mathematics to work out the sequence and endgame has become the conversation and focus of our generational thinkers.


Chris-Vincent Agyapong Febiri, Founding Editor
Chris-Vincent Agyapong Febiri is the Founding Editor of GhanaCelebrities.Com , a Film Critic and a Human Rights Advocate; he holds 2 masters degrees in Law; International Human Rights Law (LL.M) and Legal Practice Course (LL.M) from University of Leicester and Nottingham Law School--and also a degree in Law (LL.B) from University of East London. He's a Professional Truth Sayer and he is the author of the popular eBook “Success is a Right, Not A Privilege.” He currently works at Adukus Solicitors in London--where he uses his legal brains to kick real ass, for the good of clients and humanity. Contact: [email protected]