I Worry When My Doctor Husband Leaves For Work Or My Daughter Coughs Or My Throat Itches- Chimamanda Shares Her Covid-19 Plight


The Covid-19 pandemic gets scarier by the minute. Aside from the fact that we fear for ourselves, the dread of knowing that a loved one could suffer and die from it can gut you on all levels.

We cannot be too careful but in light of this lockdown, if you are just home and following the preventive measures, we can say you are almost saved from contracting the virus.

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That brings us to those who have no other option than to be out there. The nurses and doctors who are at the forefront are the ones at the risk of contracting the virus and that is what celebrity author is afraid of.

According to her, the influx of Covid-19 has proved that human lives are fleeting. She revealed that she lost an aunt a few days ago and anytime her doctor husband goes out of their door, she lives in fright till he comes back because she knows everything can happen to him out there.

“Last week, my family suffered a devastating tragedy, the very sudden death of my closest aunt, from a brain aneurysm. One day she was well and happy and the next day she was gone. Our time is filled with pain whose cause still does not feel fully true. We cry and yet we feel as though she is not really gone.??
??
And it is more surreal to grieve a sudden death in these strange times when the world has shut down, places once full are empty, heavy with the ghosts of silent gatherings, and across the world, people are dying alone. Coronavirus is a menace in the air, a menace inside our heads. Every day I am reminded of how fragile, how breakable we are.??
??.”

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“My husband is a doctor and each morning when he leaves for work, I worry. My daughter coughs and I worry. My throat itches and I worry. On Facetime, I watch my elderly parents. I admonish them gently: Don’t let people come to the house. Don’t read the rubbish news on whatsapp.??
??
This is time to cope in the best way we can. There are moments when our spirits will sag. Moments when we will feel tired after doing absolutely nothing. But how can we not? The world as it is today is foreign to us. It would be strange not to be shaken to our core.??
??.”

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Last week, my family suffered a devastating tragedy, the very sudden death of my closest aunt, from a brain aneurysm. One day she was well and happy and the next day she was gone. Our time is filled with pain whose cause still does not feel fully true. We cry and yet we feel as though she is not really gone.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ And it is more surreal to grieve a sudden death in these strange times when the world has shut down, places once full are empty, heavy with the ghosts of silent gatherings, and across the world people are dying alone. Coronavirus is a menace in the air, a menace inside our heads. Every day I am reminded of how fragile, how breakable we are.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ My husband is a doctor and each morning when he leaves for work, I worry. My daughter coughs and I worry. My throat itches and I worry. On Facetime I watch my elderly parents. I admonish them gently: Don’t let people come to the house. Don’t read the rubbish news on whatsapp.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ This is a time to cope in the best way we can. There are moments when our spirits will sag. Moments when we will feel tired after doing absolutely nothing. But how can we not? The world as it is today is foreign to us. It would be strange not to be shaken to our core.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ I cannot imagine thinking of over-achieving, or of accomplishing more than usual, when all around you the world as you know it has changed, perhaps never to return to what it used to be. And yet we must continue to go on day by day. We must choose to live. And to do so we can set small goals. Like drink more water, if you’ve spent the past ten years wanting to be more hydrated. Like learn something every day, no matter how small. Like call loved ones – not text them, call them. Like help someone – with a small cash transfer, an encouraging message, a shared laugh.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ I believe in allowing myself to feel what I feel. But endless negative feelings are enervating. And so to manage it I give myself time to feel what I am feeling – an hour, or two, or three, or four – and then when the time is up, I try to push my mind into a different territory. It doesn’t always work. But it’s worth trying for when it does work.⁣ ⁣ Continued in comments.

A post shared by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (@chimamanda_adichie) on

Source: GhanaCelebrities.Com


Miss Anita-Pyper Agyei, Senior Reporter
Ms Pyper Pebbles is a senior reporter at GhanaCelebrities.Com . She holds a Diploma in Communications from the Ghana Institute of Journalism, and she is based in Accra, Ghana. You can reach her via [email protected]