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Spy Review | It’s Just Not Melissa McCarthy’s ‘Comedy Chops’ That Make It A Must Watch…

Spy Review
Spy Review

The movie is f**king funny…

And it cleverly caters for those who love comedy, action or both in a way that you’ve probably not seen in the cinema in a long time.

When it comes to spy movies, agents are pulled back from field operations and given a boring desk/office positions as a form of punishment but for Melissa McCarthy, that was her full-time job—with no dream of ever making it onto the field as an agent.

Stationed at CIA’s Langley headquarters but in a rat infested basement, Melissa McCarthy primarily aided field agent-Bradley Fine, played with some dash James Bond fine style by Jude Law through ear pieces and contact-lens cameras. And when missions were successful, she would get to hear the recycled words; “I couldn’t have done it without you.”

Of course she once had an ambition to become a field agent and not some sort of office based agent who was more like a secretary with rats running on top of her computer. And that was not all she wanted, she had a deep crush on Bradley too, but the closest she came to that was to have dinner with him at a posh restaurant—only because Burger King was closed, so Bradley jokingly claimed when she expressed her shock.

But something went wrong when the best spy around-Bradley Fine went on an important mission—which also revealed that all the CIA field agents’ covers were blown. Without any special field agent to rescue the operation, mumsy CIA operative-Susan Cooper (Melissa McCarthy) put herself up for the ‘deadly’ mission.

Review
Spy-Review

Susan Cooper saw this as an opportunity to get into the field but this was well opposed by another brilliant field lunkhead agent-Rick Ford (played by Jason Statham). Rick was just not worried about Susan’s competence—he had been and was extremely patronising and demeaning to her. But the CIA’s head spy, Elaine Crocker (played by Allison Janney) approved the mission—time was therefore set for Susan Cooper to go ‘invisible’ in the field.

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